Hawkley: Church

Hawkley Parish Church




Hawkley Church


This page has two sections- Current church information at the top and History further down.

Contacts for The Church of St. Peter & St. Paul, Hawkley

The Vicar

Revd. Rona Stuart-Bourne

01730 827459

 Rona can be emailed here:

 

Diocesan Reader

Miss Elizabeth Hawkins

01730 827502

Church Wardens

Mrs Jane Wyman

01420 511306

Neil Chrimes

01730 827992

Vice Chairman

Graham Johnson

01730 827222

Treasurer

Robin Crittenden

01730 827969

PCC Secretary

Mrs Molly Keer

01730 827696



BENEFICE SERVICES

December 2017

Sunday December 3rd – 1st Sunday of Advent

Empshott     9.15 a.m.  -  Holy Communion - Book of Common Prayer

Hawkley   - 10.30 a.m.    Holy Communion – Common Worship

Friday December 8th

Hawkley    9.00 p.m.  -  Candlelit Holy Communion with music and reflection

Sunday December 10th  – 2nd Sunday of Advent

Empshott      9.15 a.m.  -  Holy Communion - Book of Common Prayer

Hawkley   -  10.30 a.m.    Morning Service - “With Heart and Voice”

Priors Dean – 6.30 p.m.    Evening Prayer - Book of Common Prayer

Monday December 11th

Hawkley    4.00 p.m.  -  Christingle at Lower Green farm

Sunday December 17th – 3rd Sunday of Advent

Empshott      9.15 a.m.  -  Holy Communion - Book of Common Prayer

Hawkley    -  10.30 a.m.    Said Holy Communion - Common Worship

Hawkley    -   4.00 p.m.  -  Carol Service

Wednesday December 20th

Priors Dean    6.00 p.m.  -  Carol Service

Friday December 22nd

Hawkley    7.00 p.m.  -  Carols on the Green

Saturday December 23rd

Empshott    4.00 p.m.  -  Carol Service

Sunday December 24th – Christmas Eve

Empshott     No Service

Hawkley   - 10.30 a.m.    “Is There Room?” a service of readings and carols

Monday December 25th – Christmas Day

Empshott      9.15 a.m.  -  Holy Communion - Book of Common Prayer

Priors Dean – 9.30 a.m.    Holy Communion - Book of Common Prayer

Hawkley   -  10.30 a.m.    Family Christmas Service

Sunday December 31st – 1st Sunday of Christmas

Empshott – 10.00 a.m.   BENEFICE Holy Communion - Book of Common Prayer

 

Coffee is served after Sunday services in Hawkley and all are very welcome to join us.

Monday mornings. 9.00 a.m. – 10 a.m. - a time for prayer, readings and quiet reflection in Hawkley.

Morning Prayer is usually said at 7.30 a.m. - Monday to Friday in Hawkley.




FIND US:

St Peter & St Paul’s Parish Church, Hawkley, Hampshire, GU33 6NF

 

WEDDINGS

Marriage is the moment when we promise ourselves completely and exclusively to one other person for the rest of our lives. The marriage service is a beautiful, special and holy one, in which the bride and groom make promises to each other, and so become husband and wife. For more information, email the vicar on  

The Church of England’s wedding website is packed with useful information: https://www.yourchurchwedding.org/

 

CHRISTENINGS (Also known as Baptism)

During a christening your child will be Baptized with water. It’s the start of an amazing journey of faith for your child and a special day for all your friends and family. Follow the links to find answers to your questions and to explore all that a christening means, not just on the day but long afterwards. https://churchofenglandchristenings.org/

It’s not just for children, adults can be Baptised too! Please email our vicar on for more information

 

FUNERALS

A funeral is used to mark the end of a person's life here on earth. Family and friends come together to express grief, give thanks for the life lived and commend the person into God's keeping. These can be a small, quiet ceremony or a large occasion in a packed church.

Everyone is entitled to either a burial service (funeral) or to have their ashes buried in their local parish churchyard by their local parish priest regardless of whether they attended church or not. Please email our vicar on for more information

https://churchofenglandfunerals.org/



History

The Church of St. Peter & St. Paul , dating from 1865, is a fine example built in the Norman style in local stone. Its architect was Samuel Sanders Teulon. He was of Huguenot descent, born in 1812 at Greenwich, setting up in independent practice in 1838, and being constantly in demand until he died in 1873.

Teulon's earlier designs were generally in Tudor or Elizabethan styles, but he later became a supporter of the Gothic revival; he also restored and recast many Churches. It was J.J. Maberly, of Hawkley Hurst, for whom he had previously designed a house, who commissioned Teulon to build the Church. It is in stone after a simple design in the Norman style; and the tower is a ?Rhenish Helm?, more usually found on the continent, though there is a fine medieval example at Sompting in Sussex. It is not known what were the reasons for the design being used here, nor indeed for any of the designs for the rest of the Church, which are very restrained and must have been entirely different from Teulon's usual style at that date. At all events he has left us a Church which is both suitable to its surroundings, and extremely attractive in itself, and for which we have every reason to be grateful.

The building is cruciform, though the transverse arms terminated by gables containing rose windows, do not extend beyond the ground plan of the aisles. The nave is divided into three bays. The pillars which separate it from the aisles have elaborately carved capitals, the subjects being emblems of our Lord and of the Evangelists. The corbels supporting the open timbered roof are carved into the forms of the trees mentioned in Scripture, the palm, plane, ebony, vine, pomegranate, fig, gourd, olive and rose of Sharon. The corbels in the aisles are angels.

The east window consists of three lights, above which is a circular window. These are memorial windows and filled with painted glass by Ward and Hughes. In the centre is the Ascension, and on either side, the Baptism of Christ and the Last Supper. The rose window above, depicts Christ in majesty. Windows in the aisles contain figures of the Twelve Apostles. 
Photographs depicting the stained glass windows in St Peter and St Paul church can be viewed by clicking on the following link:

http://www.hampshirechurchwindows.co.uk/showchurch2.php?id=14

In the south wall of the chancel there was a particularly fine carved alabaster panel, of English work, depicting the betrayal of Christ by Judas. This was stolen in the 1980's, but we are fortunate to have a carved wooden replica of it. It is suggested in the Victoria County History of Hampshire that it originally formed part of the reredos of the old Church, but this is not certain. The stone pulpit was removed in 1996, and its base now forms the Altar in the Maberly Chapel.

The Organ is a 19th century instrument, by the London firm of Bevington, originally with a mechanical or tracker action. Ivemey & Cooper rebuilt it in 1939, with pneumatic action. In 1999 it was rebuilt by Henry Willis & Sons, with electric action, and the addition of a second manual.

At the east end of the south aisle, in the arch above the organ screen, is the Hawkley Mural, installed in 1991, and the work of local artist, Sally Maltby. Above the words, ?I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills,? it depicts the cycle of life in the countryside.

In the belfry there are eight bells, three of them from the old church, two from about 1450 and one from 1624. When the present church was built, Rebecca Maberly presented two more bells. In 1900, another was added in memory of Churchwarden George Wakeford, and Mr. and Mrs. Clive Davies gave the last two in memory of their son Harold, killed in action with the Royal Navy in World War II. The Tenor weighs 8cwt. 1qtr. 25lbs. and was recast in 1997 in memory of former Tower Captain, Charles Pound. It replaced the one given by Rebecca Maberly in 1867.

To mark the millennium, a new west window was installed. It is the work of Simon Whistler, and depicts a cockerel, and the crossed key and sword, emblem of St. Peter and St. Paul. The Archdeacon of the Meon, the Ven. Peter Hancock, dedicated it at a special service in September 2000.

All the grave monuments (headstones & memorials) in St Peter and St Pauls Hawkley, have now been catalogued as part of the International Directory of Grave Monuments. This directory records a photograph of the monument and the monument inscription, where possible. All this information is available free of charge, on line by following this link. We are very grateful to Mrs S Potts for cataloguing and photographing these monuments.

Please click here to go to the directory.

Priors Dean is a small, scattered hamlet in an isolated rural area. There is no village hall or shop, only the tiny, ancient church at the centre of the parish. The church is in an isolated position, though the Manor House and some cottages are nearby. Its origins are lost in the mists of time, as is the dedication of the church. It may be on a pagan site, and it is almost certain that the yew tree in the churchyard is over 2000 years old. Some distance away, almost on what, in comparison with the lanes, might be called a main road, and nearly in the neighbouring parish of Froxfield, is the White Horse Inn, or "Pub with no name". Here, the poet Edward Thomas, who lived just down the road at Steep, was inspired to write Up in the Wind. The area round about is one of the highest parts of Hampshire.

Priors Dean Church
Priors Dean Church

Priors Dean once belonged to Southwick Priory near Fareham. The small rustic Norman and Early English Church on a Saxon foundation, stands in a deep combe among the wooded hangers. It serves a small and scattered rural community, but is noted for the Compton (Tichborne) family monuments.

The Church has a nave and chancel with a timber bell turret carved on four large posts at the west end. It is entered by a fine Norman door ornamented with billet and zigzag mouldings. The nave is Norman but the windows and chancel arch are modern reproductions, as is the font. There was a restoration in 1857, but roofs of both nave and chancel are old.

The Chancel is Early English, containing a piscina and the following monuments:

(1) on floor in north east corner, brass to John and Joan Compton, 1586;

(2) on north wall, Bndget (nee Compton), wife of Nicholas Stoughton, who was born in 1610, married in 1625, aged 15, and died in 1631 aged 21. She is represented by a kneeling effigy under a canopy, her two surviving daughters beside her, while two of her children who died are shown in their shrouds. A long Latin inscription records the details of this tragic girl;

(3) on the same wall another kneeling effigy, coloured, under a canopy to Elizabeth Tichborne (nee Compton), 1622, sister of Bridget Compton;

(4) on the south wall a very handsome monument of alabaster and black marble to Sir John Compton and his wife Bridget, 1653, with their portrait busts in oval frames. This was set up by Compton Tichborne, their grandson, whose similar memorial adjoins that of his grandparents on the west.


 


© nick davis 2009